Primed and ready!

Over the weekend members of the Save The Trident team met at the museum to carry out more preparation work on G-ARPO. Since Saturday was mostly a washout we had to revert to indoor activities such as preparing the seats and covers, clothing our new hostess (she's called Tracy) in her authentic BA uniform and putting up the ceiling panels in the cockpit. Our amazing carpenter...
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Lights in action!

We thought we'd show you some pictures of recent work inside G-ARPO. We've been adding power to the aircraft to allow us to install lighting in various places. So far we've managed to add lights to the toilets, certain signs, and even the forward galley. Discrete power sockets have also been installed which will help us in the future when we want to clean, or set up displ...
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When G-ARPO’s engine exploded!

We recently spoke to another former pilot of our Trident 1C, John Preston, who recounted the story of the only emergency in his flying career which actually took place on G-ARPO. As part of the crew preparing to fly the aircraft back to London from Rome on 1st October, 1970, upon commencing their take-off run the number 1 engine suddenly exploded causing them to abandon take...
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Move to Sunderland in pictures

The move of Trident G-ARPO up to the North East Aircraft Museum at Sunderland went like a dream. Over two days, we were helped by lots of great people and companies, including (in no particular order): MSD Cranes, JDPL, Serco for their co-operation, Give Svaergods and JParr (Mboro). Also a big thanks to Northumbria Police for arranging the escort team (Cleveland and Durham P...
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Can you help with our costs? Time is short!

As we approach move date at the speed of a Trident in cruise (fastest subsonic airliner in its day, don't you know!), we've been landed with a big insurance bill to top us up to the required amount for the move. This amounts to an extra £2000 in costs, which we just don't have lying around! In addition to this, the cost of the move is a little more than anticipated. Ca...
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Move date announced

We can now announce the date we will move Trident 1C G-ARPO up to the North East Aircraft Museum at Sunderland. The date set by our transport permit is Sunday 31st July. We will begin on Saturday 30th by moving the aircraft from Serco's fire training ground at Teesside and lifting it over the various gates that the load will be too wide to travel through. Then, early o...
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Wings clipped but ready to fly!

Two more days of work on G-ARPO at Durham Tees Valley and the last stage of dismantling the aircraft is now complete! Over Thursday and Friday we worked on removing the wings from the aircraft so that she can be transported by road to the North East Aircraft Museum at Sunderland. We had worked out that it would be possible to cut outside of the main landing gear which would ...
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More dismantling progress made

The final stage of dismantling the Trident was started today when the team met. First of all, the remaining #3 engine side pod was removed, leaving the rear of the aircraft clear for the move. Then, after marking up the lines to cut along the wings, Stan (from MSD) and Neil began pre-cutting. They also opened up places to attach the crane lines when the wings are cut. ...
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Can you help save our Trident?

As we move forward towards the final stages of dismantling Trident 1C G-ARPO ready to move to Sunderland, our costs have increased as we have to find £300 extra for costs of scaffolding. Can you help? Everyone who donates to our project - even if it's only a few pounds - is helping to preserve this aircraft for future generations to enjoy and look back on. It will be the...
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Trident Tail Removed

We had another productive day on the Trident on 3rd February 2011. Members of the team, along with hired contractors from MSD Cranes, SAS Access and Henderson Engineering met at Teesside on what was a bright but windy and cold day ready to make some more progress. The main focus of the day was to remove the tail fin and number 2 engine intake. This would require a lot of cut...
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